Storm Control

by Pablo Carlier.

Another example why I believe even a virtual-overlay based solution for the Cloud-Oriented-DC should not be hypervisor centric.
Software-defined data center is one thing. Software-defined ≠ Built-entirely-upon-and-for-VM-workloads. I see some twisted logic in some conceptions of what the SDDC is.
Hypervisor-based-overlay-only data center just addresses a small part of the problem. Containers, Hadoop, Nutanix, NAS…
I would not want to leave any of those out of my Cloud strategy as second-class citizens.

Another example why I believe even a virtual-overlay based solution for the Cloud-Oriented-DC should not be hypervisor centric.

Software-defined data center is one thing. Software-defined ≠ Built-entirely-upon-and-for-VM-workloads. I see some twisted logic in some conceptions of what the SDDC is.

Hypervisor-based-overlay-only data center just addresses a small part of the problem. Containers, Hadoop, Nutanix, NAS…

I would not want to leave any of those out of my Cloud strategy as second-class citizens.

Why the sky is not falling over Amazon Web Services »

Cloudpundit’s Lydia Leong on AWS 2Q14 and why the sky is not falling (via ira):

Amazon posted weaker 2Q 2014 results for Amazon Web Services, leading some to speculate about competitive pressures despite continued enormous growth in usage.

and

Lowering the price expands the addressable market, as well. The cheaper it is to do it in the cloud, the more difficult it is to make a business case to do an on-premises solution, especially a private cloud. 

Many of Gartner’s clients tell us that even if they have a financially viable case to build a private cloud right now, their costs will be essentially static over the amortization period of 3 to 5 years — versus their expectation that the major IaaS providers will drop prices 30% every year. Time-to-value for private cloud is generally 18 to 24 months, and it typically delivers a much more limited set of features, especially where developer enablement is concerned.

It’s tough for internal IT to compete, especially when the major IT vendors aren’t delivering software that allows IT to create equivalent capabilities at the speed of an AWS, Microsoft, or Google.

Keywords to follow here:

  • Time to value.
  • Feature set.

Keywords missing:

  • Customization.
  • Hybrid.

Traditional IT clearly needs to move faster and be bolder to be able to compete in a new world where everything runs as a service, utility-like. 

Startups can build themselves around what is available. To them, customization or hybrid don’t make any sense.

It seems evident to me that a hybrid approach will be the only viable option  to most large enterprises, where customization and hybrid are a must.

Same destination, but very different roads. That is how I see it.

This is why containers (LXC, Docker) are set to storm over the world the same way the Virtual Machine did ten years ago.
David Strauss, Pantheon’s CTO and Co-Founder, back in 2013:

Containers Now Offer the Same Features as VMS, but with Minimal Overhead
Compared to a virtual machine, the overhead of a container is disruptively low. They start so fast that many configurations can launch on-demand as requests come in, resulting in zero idle memory and CPU overhead. 

This is why containers (LXC, Docker) are set to storm over the world the same way the Virtual Machine did ten years ago.

David Strauss, Pantheon’s CTO and Co-Founder, back in 2013:

Containers Now Offer the Same Features as VMS, but with Minimal Overhead

Compared to a virtual machine, the overhead of a container is disruptively low. They start so fast that many configurations can launch on-demand as requests come in, resulting in zero idle memory and CPU overhead. 

The company starts valuing the great salesmen, because they’re the ones who can move the needle on revenues, not the product engineers and designers. So the salespeople end up running the company.

When the sales guys run the company, the product guys don’t matter as much, and a lot of them just turn off.

– Steve Jobs, via Ben Thompson.

Docker ready to take over the world »

Scott Johnston, Docker’s senior vice president of Product:
In the age of short-lived applications driven by the cloud and microservices, Docker offers access to virtualized environments that achieve unprecedented portability.

These are the days of miracle and wonder.

The Virtual Machine of the Cloud Era is here. Faster, more efficient, more portable, more flexible. It is everything the old virtual machine was meant to be before it became fat and bloated. I for one welcome our new DevOps overlords.

“Latency in itself does not have to be an issue; it’s the unpredictability of latency that really causes the problems.”

– Jelle Frank van der Zwet.

Splitting up Microsoft. »

Ben Thompson describes a future for two different Microsofts. And it is only bright for one of them.

Microsoft needs to wake up before it gets eaten alive by Box.net or any other cloud company that can understand this strategy. Enterprises still need a productivity platform, it is just not the same platform that worked 15 years ago.

Nadella seems to have woken up to the fact that devices are a high margin opportunity or a low margin money pit, depending on which game you play. Azure is steamy hot at the moment, growing at 150%. Microsoft has decades of experience in corporate user workspaces, productivity tools, database software… and a solid cloud computing platform.

Devices are nothing but a humongous distraction. Seattle is not Cupertino. Microsoft is not Apple, and they need not be so in order to return to their glory days. They just need to keep laser focus on what they can excel at. Looking at Microsoft.com today does just not show that focus at all.

“The difference between successful people and very successful people is that very successful people say no to almost everything.”

Warren Buffett